Saturday, August 9, 2014

Thoughts On: WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS - an ebook short by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of We Should All Be Feminists, a personal, eloquently-argued essay—adapted from her much-viewed Tedx talk of the same name—by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award-winning author of Americanah and Half of a Yellow Sun
With humor and levity, here Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century—one rooted in inclusion and awareness. She shines a light not only on blatant discrimination, but also the more insidious, institutional behaviors that marginalize women around the world, in order to help readers of all walks of life better understand the often masked realities of sexual politics. Throughout, she draws extensively on her own experiences—in the U.S., in her native Nigeria, and abroad—offering an artfully nuanced explanation of why the gender divide is harmful for women and men, alike. Argued in the same observant, witty and clever prose that has made Adichie a bestselling novelist, here is one remarkable author’s exploration of what it means to be a woman today—and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists.

Book Review: SUMOTORI: A 21st CENTURY SAMURAI THRILLER by GP Hutchinson

A sumo wrestler. Really? A sumo wrestler?

Not just any sumo wrestler, but a yokozuna--a sumo grand champion of almost legendary status. His name is Tatsuyama, and the women love him. Actually, just about everybody loves him.

Why then does young detective Kobayashi Koji believe Tatsuyama's drop-dead-gorgeous girlfriend has framed him for the crime that gets him kicked out of competition? When Tatsuyama himself goes to ask her, he discovers she's dropped off the grid.

Follow Tatsuyama and Detective Kobayashi from Tokyo's glitziest shopping districts to Kyoto's most traditional gardens and find out why men like Tatsuyama are known as the last of the samurai.

Saturday, August 2, 2014

Friday Things: 08/01 - A Sumo diet and the daily sketches of Skottie Young

[Oh man, it's August already! Also, yay, I'm back! Although, this month might be light because it's also when I'll be having my summer break. While I'm enjoying my vacation, I may or may not post regular link dumps. We shall see!]

On Books and Comics: 


Skottie Young is one of my favorite comics artists at the moment, and you can buy his latest sketchbook (called Daily Grind) right now.

Did you take advantage of that sick deal by Marvel during SDCC and sign up for Marvel Unlimited last weekend? Here's a great place to look for some direction if you are overwhelmed by the options.

Have an excerpt of Haruki Murakami's upcoming book Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage

On YouTube:


(via Cheezburger) Very cool documentary-type video about the diet of a Sumo wrestler.

Catch this Wicked medley by Peter Hollens and Nick Pitera.

On Cool People:


You might be surprised by what you'll hear if you ask a homeless person to tell you their story.

George R R Martin continues to be a totally rad and awesome person.

One of the things that will, guaranteed, get me to notice an author and look up their work is a fantastic interview like this. Hello, Amy Bloom!

On Disney:


Cute post: 11 steps to a better you with Winnie the Pooh.

How-to: Draw Anna from Frozen.

[Wow, I think this is the first time I've done a link dump without an 'other' category! Cheers, have a nice weekend~]

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Manga Review: Manga Classics LES MISÉRABLES

"The first release in UDON's new Manga Classics line!
Adapted for stage and screen, loved by millions, Victor Hugo's classic novel of love & tragedy during the French Revolution is reborn in this fantastic new manga edition!

The gorgeous art of TseMei Lee brings to life the tragic stories of Jean Valjean, Inspector Javert, and the beautiful Fantine, in this epic adaptation of Les Misérables!"

Friday, July 25, 2014

Bite-Sized Book Reviews: DARTH VADER AND SON, VADER'S LITTLE PRINCESS, and GOODNIGHT DARTH VADER

In case you couldn't tell, the theme this time around is Jeffrey Brown's graphic novels about Darth Vader in a zany alternate world where he gets to raise Luke and Leia. Though I read Vader's Little Princess a while back, I read the other two more recently, and decided I may as well review them all together. By the way, I've also read Jeffrey Brown's Jedi Academy and wrote my thoughts on that earlier this year.

Darth Vader and Son and Vader's Little Princess

I have a lot of the same things to say about both of these books, so I'm going to review them together. In each, we get to see mostly the relationship between Vader and the respective twin implied by the title. A lot of the scenes in the book come straight out of the movies, but with a bit of humorous parenting added. Iconic lines, locations, characters, and lead-ins to what ended up being important conversations in the films were adapted to parenting, or botched by one of the kids. Many new scenes were also made up, of course, such as Leia getting dropped off at school or learning to pilot.

If I really had to choose just one of the two, I found Leia's way funnier, and I feel like Brown got so much more creative with it than with Darth Vader and Son. Some of the themes Princess dealt with extended beyond the little moments with a young kid, and spanned into "she's growing up too fast," which Son didn't. Either way though, both are fantastic, warm-fuzzy-feeling, and make great nightstand table or gift books. I highly recommend them for Star Wars (old and new) fans of all ages - even folks who don't really know the franchise.

Goodnight Darth Vader

I was so happy when I learned this book was a thing - it was just released this week. Though the other two books I talked about above had brief other-twin-cameos, they largely dealt with Vader's relationship with just the one sibling. In Goodnight Darth Vader, we get to experience bedtime stories as told by Big Daddy himself to both of the twins at bed time. Sure, it isn't the Luke and Leia antics I was hoping for, but it's still a surprisingly sweet book that brings up a ton of characters and aspects of the Star Wars universe in the context of hitting the ol' hay. Cameos include Han Solo and Chewie, Ahsoka Tano, General Grievous, Admiral Ackbar, and even Sebulba. Brown dug deep and wide to include all sorts of characters and create funny scenes about what they all do when it's bed time.

As with the above books, I recommend this one for all ages and all levels of Star Wars know-how.


Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Elementary School Lunch Catchup: Week of July 14th

After a week(ish) of silence, I've returned! My adapter broke so I had to hit the pause button on blogging for a bit there. But I'm back, and thankfully my catching-up won't be too bad: last week marked the end of the Spring term, and the students are now out on summer break. Regular lunch posts will resume in September after this one.

Since I'm posting five lunches today, I've put them under a page break so it doesn't take up so much space for those just browsing. <3

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Elementary School Lunch: 07/10 - Italian basil spaghetti salad


A little late, but here's Thursday's lunch (no Friday lunch because we had a 'typhoon day' - the stuff we were supposed to have then will be added to our meal another day).

We had raisin bread, omelet, pasta salad, and soup. I actually kept my bread to enjoy for breakfast the next day, because the soup and salad were pretty filling, with all the spaghetti and all that. The salad also had cabbage, cucumber, carrots, and corn, while the soup had bits of winter melon, radish, potato, spinach, more carrot, and chunks of ham. We used Italian basil dressing on the salad, too.

Altogether yum.

Calorie count: 620

Friday, July 11, 2014

Book Review: ALIAS HOOK by Lisa Jensen

"'Every child knows how the story ends. The wicked pirate captain is flung overboard, caught in the jaws of the monster crocodile who drags him down to a watery grave. But it was not yet my time to die. It's my fate to be trapped here forever, in a nightmare of childhood fancy, with that infernal, eternal boy.'

Meet Captain James Benjamin Hook, a witty, educated Restoration-era privateer cursed to play villain to a pack of malicious little boys in a pointless war that never ends. But everything changes when Stella Parrish, a forbidden grown woman, dreams her way to the Neverland in defiance of Pan’s rules. From the glamour of the Fairy Revels, to the secret ceremonies of the First Tribes, to the mysterious underwater temple beneath the Mermaid Lagoon, the magical forces of the Neverland open up for Stella as they never have for Hook. And in the pirate captain himself, she begins to see someone far more complex than the storybook villain.

With Stella’s knowledge of folk and fairy tales, she might be Hook’s last chance for redemption and release if they can break his curse before Pan and his warrior boys hunt her down and drag Hook back to their neverending game. Alias Hook by Lisa Jensen is a beautifully and romantically written adult fairy tale perfect for fans of Gregory Maguire and Paula Brackston."